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Nedow Looking for Big Number at Commonwealth Games
Tim Nedow will compete on July 27 in the qualifying round of the men's shot put.

Tim Nedow will compete on July 27 in the qualifying round of the men's shot put.

July 25, 2014

Commonwealth Games

CHICAGO – What Tim Nedow accomplished at DePaul might be just the beginning of a stellar international track and field career.

After repeating as the shot-put champion at the recent Canadian Track and Field Championships in Moncton, New Brunswick, Nedow has his sights set on the prestigious Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games with track and field running from July 27-Aug. 2 in Scotland. The event featuring competition among 71 nations began Thursday with swimming, judo, rhythmic gymnastics, cycling and squash.

A season in which the 2012 Blue Demon graduate has consistently thrown for more than 20 meters has Nedow focused on reaching the elite level of his sport.

“I’m still young and have been steadily improving since I graduated from DePaul,” said Nedow who won the Canadian national title by nearly two meters with a throw of 20.60. “The biggest step for me this year has been consistency. This is the first year I have been over 20 meters in every meet but one.

“At the Triton Invitational in San Diego, I recorded throws of 20.98, 20.85 and 20.77. The 20.98 is my personal best. There was a 20.71 at Kansas and the 20.60 at nationals. I had a 20.45 at another meet.

“I feel like the 21 and better is coming. I had a meet last weekend in Belgium before beginning to prepare for the Commonwealth Games.”

Nedow set the DePaul indoor record with a toss of 20.51 and also holds the outdoor mark of 19.69. He admitted to being a little nervous about securing a qualifying mark for Canadian nationals until he competed in an entertaining meet in mid-April at Kansas.

“I needed to hit the ‘A’ standard in qualifying for the Canadian Track and Field Championships, and was able to hit that mark a few times including the second meet of the season,” Nedow said. “I threw 20.71 meters at Kansas and got qualifying out of the way early.

“That was an awesome time. At that meet, they held the shot-put competition in downtown Lawrence. They put in a cement ring and sand and invited people to come and watch. They called it ‘The Shot in the Dark.’

“It was pretty cool because all eyes were on you. Normally at meets, there are running races and other events going on during the shot put. But not at this meet. Actually, quite a few people walking around downtown came over to watch. I enjoy having people coming to see me perform.”

Nedow came to New Brunswick on June 27 as one of the favorites.

“Going into nationals, I was pretty confident it would come down to me and Justin Roche,” Nedow said. “I fouled on my first throw and had to play it safe on the next one. Even so, I was able to throw it 19.60 meters which gave me the lead.

“My third attempt went 20.60 which was the winning mark as Justin was second at 18.64. With my last several throws, there was no holding back as I was trying to go for a big number. My last throw was 21.39 but I fouled.”

Even so, that is the kind of big number Nedow has in mind when he begins competing Sunday in Scotland.

“I’ll need to hit a big number to win it,” Nedow said. “Throwing the shot 20 meters won’t win it for me with the other competitors throwing in the 21-meter range.

“I can’t be afraid to go after it. I saw on the video of my 21.39 throw that it’s there. I know I am just around the corner from reaching that mark and more. Throwing over 21 meters and winning the Commonwealth Games would open up some opportunities for me.

“It would provide a chance to compete in the IAAF Diamond League circuit with the best athletes in the world. For me to get into those meets, I need to have a big throw. There are Olympic and World Championship medalists there and others with throws over 21 meters. With the Diamond League, there is also the possibility of earning some money.

“If I can win the Commonwealth Games and beat some of the better throwers with a 21 mark, it will help me a lot getting into a Diamond League meet.”

Heaving that 16-pound metal ball has given Nedow an opportunity to do a little globe-trotting.

“Throwing the shot put has been opening more doors and given me a chance to travel around the world,” Nedow said. “I’ve competed in Russia, China, Sweden, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Trinidad and Tobago with Scotland coming up.

“I’ve met throwers from different countries and formed some friendships. When I was in the Netherlands, those guys took me around Amsterdam and I had a great time.”